Category Archives: News

The Edgars–Mystery Awards

Last night, May 1, The Edgar Awards were announced in New York City. Named for the guy who started the whole genre, Edgar Alan Poe, the Edgars honor all types of mystery and crime writing by American authors. A Traveler’s Library, as usual, is looking for those with a strong sense of place that might interest travelers.  Here are the big winners and some nominees that fit the bill.

BEST NOVEL

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger.  [Setting: Minnesota]Here Krueger departs from his popular Cork O’Connor mystery series with a coming of age novel about a boy facing multiple deaths and searching for reason. In 2009, when we were on a virtual road trip around the United States, we featured an interview with Krueger about his book, Vermillion Drift. Now that he’s won the big Edgar, you might want to see how this author’s mind works, by reading that interview.

You might also be interested in the nominated How the Light Gets In [Setting: Quebec] by Louise Penny. Part of the Chief Inspector Armand Gamache series, it follows one we reviewed here in 2011, A Trick of the Light. Penny does an excellent job of setting the scene, lus developing very interesting characters, although I was disappointed that I listened to an audio book rather than reading it in print.

Standing in Another Man’s Grave [Setting Edinburgh] features the a return of a retired character in a popular series by Ian Rankin.

Until She Comes Home [Setting Detroit] by Lori Roy.  Former Edgar award winner for Bent Road.


Best New Novel by an American Writer

Red Sparrow, by John Matthews [Setting: Russia] The cold war spy games between Russia and America (will they never end?) have been mined practically into extinction, but Matthews has a new angle–the spies who were specifically trained to use sexual wiles to get information.   Red Sparrow intrigued me when I heard about it and sounds like a very good read.

Others travelers who read might like:

I have to admit that I was pulling for Tucsonan Becky Masterman in this category for her excellent first crime novel, Rage Against the Dying [Setting: Tucson/Oro Valley] . We reviewed it after seeing her at the 2013 Tucson Festival of Books.

Ghostman [setting: Atlantic City] by Roger Hobbs. A casino robbery gone wrong and a mysterious “fixer.”

You can see the entire list of nominees and award winners at the Edgars website.  Please let me know if there are others I should have included here.

Note: Some titles and book covers here are linked to Amazon, in case you’d like to purchase a copy of a book. When you use these links, it costs you no more, but A Traveler’s Library gets a few cents to keep us in business. Thanks.

Timbuctu Is a Travel Dream. Mali is Reality.

Timbuctu, Mali

Timbuctu, Mali, photo by Elin Reitehaug

The legendary Timbuktu stands in the African country of Mali.  When travelers daydream, one of the things they daydream about is Timbuktu. But in recent years, revolution has brought the country Mali to a standstill.  One of the things that stands in the way of a stable country is the high illiteracy rate.

You can do something about that.

Building a school in Mali

BuildOn.org Building a school in Mali

You may recall that Passports with Purpose had a goal of $115,000 to help the organization buildOn construct schools in Mali. They raised a very respectable $84,000. That awesome accomplishment  (which builds two schools plus providing adult literacy programs in one of the poorest countries in the world) makes me happy. But it isn’t quite the original goal.

Today is the big day when Passports with Purpose notifies the people who won some loot in their fund raiser for schools in Mali. 

But the people who contributed to Passports with Purpose efforts to help buildOn.org are WINNERS, even if they don’t get loot.

The deadline for winning that “loot” is past.

If you missed the deadline, and you still think it is a nifty idea to build schools in Mali, there’s good news for you. You can still donate. Just go to the Passports with Purpose donate page. 100% of your contribution goes to buildOn, the group who works with locals to provide schools and literacy programs.

I would be doubly thrilled if the hard work of the travel bloggers behind this project wound up raising enough money to fund ANOTHER school in Mali, wouldn’t you? Every little bit helps, so if you have not yet contributed to Passports with Purpose, please give yourself the gift of feeling really good about helping people who REALLY need the help.

Book Cover--Timbuctoo, Mali
And if you’re still dreaming the traveler’s dream of Timbucktu, read my review of Timbuctoo, by Tahir Shah– a historical look (in fictional form) at the search for the exotic Timbucktu. But if you’d like a look at the real Mali, read Jessica Voigt’s review of How to Make a Quilt in Africa.

Supporting Education, Literacy, and Empowerment in Mali

Cultural Travel

By Jessica Voigts

Book Cover: How to Make an African Quilt
Destination: Mali

Book: How to Make an African Quilt: The Story of the Patchwork Project of Segou, Mali  by Bonnie Lee Black

Mali is the 5th poorest country in the world (UN Human Development Index), and has one of the world’s lowest literacy rates.

This year’s Passports with Purpose project is to raise $115,00 for buildOn to construct three schools and fund three adult literacy programs in southern Mali. Steadfast in their commitment to break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy in Mali, buildOn has sustained their school construction program in the country amidst the current civil unrest north of the capital.

Passports with Purpose is an annual event; a fundraiser by travel bloggers to help communities in need. Created in 2008, it has changed lives around the world, by building wells in Haiti with water.org, libraries in Zambia with Room to Read, houses for families in India with Land for Tillers Freedom, a school in rural Cambodia with American Assistance for Cambodia, and donations to Heifer International.

Bonnie Lee Black in Mali

Bonnie Lee Black, picture used with permission of Bonnie Lee black and Wandering Educators.

But Mali is so far away, one might note. How can we get involved? Here’s a personal story, of living in Mali and helping others. It’s an inspiration to get involved, to support Passports with Purpose and other philanthropic organizations working in Mali…

It’s one of THOSE books. You tear through it, unable to put it down. Read while cooking, eating, even postponing sleep until you just can’t keep your eyes open any more. I’m very happy to share my latest read, one of THOSE books. Yes, it’s one of the best books I’ve read all year. Written by Bonnie Lee Black, How to Make an African Quilt: The Story of the Patchwork Project of Segou, Mali is an incredible read.

A former Peace Corps volunteer, Bonnie headed to Mali and changed lives (her own, included). If you’ve ever wondered if your NGO or Peace Corps or volunteer work has made a difference, this is a book to dive into and savor. For you will recognize many common truths about working overseas – the joys and challenges, the amazing people, the interest and hard work of some to better their lives, and the powerful role that educators play in this transformation.

Women in Mali quilting

Women in Mali quilting, Photo used with permission of Bonnie Lee Black and Wandering Educators

In this book, Bonnie shares the inspiration and tracks the progress of an unusual project to help people help themselves. After working with the Peace Corps in Gabon, she headed to Mali to build a welcoming home, peaceful garden, wondrous community. She worked with young girls to teach them how to crochet plastic bags into something useful, in a class that taught hard work, crafting, and ways to make money from their work.

Teaching Mali girls to crochet

Teaching Mali girls to crochet. Photo used with permission of Bonnie Lee Black and Wandering Educators.

These Malian women’s new skills can – and will – make a difference in their lives. It’s the power of education to better lives; it’s the vision, strength, and hard work of one woman to implement change and empowerment. I can honestly say that Bonnie Lee Black is a hero – in more than one sense of the word. She knows her SELF. She works tirelessly to educate and assist others, all with a sense of humor and grace. And yes, she changes lives. As you can surmise, I highly recommend this book – it’s a treasure.

Read more about Bonnie Lee Black and her Mali project at Wandering Educators.

How to Cook a Crocodile
And see A Traveler’s Library review of her first book, How to Cook a Crocodile, here.

 

 

 

Don’t forget to check out the page where you can contribute $10 to build schools in Mali and get a chance on a fabulous prize at Passports With Purpose.

 

Note: The book covers are linked to Amazon.com.  A Traveler’s Library is an affiliate of Amazon, and during the holidays, when you are shopping on line, we appreciate your going to Amazon through our links. It costs you no more, but it helps us pay the rent on this space.