Tag Archives: Jessica Voigts

13 Best Places to Eat, Shop,Travel and Enjoy

Cultural Travel

Cultural Finds in 2013

By Jessica Voigts

A new year, and a look back at old favorites, leads me to realize that I’m always thinking about food and culture. Not a surprise, given my lifelong pursuit of both! Take a look at some of my favorite posts from the past year (hint: food cues forthcoming).

Recipes

Canadian butter tarts

Canadian butter tarts. Photo by Jessica Voigts

I love mixing travel and food. In fact, travel for me is food! In this article, Shakespeare and Tarts in Stratford, Canada , family reminiscences coincide with my Granny’s recipe for Canadian butter tarts. Ah, Stratford, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways…

One of the most popular recipes on Wandering Educators this year was my Dark Chocolate Pomegranate Bark – it’s easy, healthy, and delicious! 


Restaurants & Resources

Scotland Food: Mallaig Prawns

Fresh Mallaig Prawns, The Tea Garden, Mallaig, Scotland – Jessie Voigts

Oh, Scotland – full of such great food! In Exploring Scottish Food One Bite At a Time, I share my favorite restaurants – and some great resources for Scottish food.

One of our editors at Wandering Educators, Casey Siemasko, shared an article on the experience of Night Markets in Taiwan . She notes that your attitude is critical to success – and shares some shopping tips that come from experience.

Shopping

In How to Take a Delicious Cultural Odyssey, Close to Home I shared my technique of going global while staying local. Whether it is food, books, or art, you don’t need to leave the country to explore the world.

Our Chief Editor, Brianna Krueger, shares some shopping tips that all travelers can use, in Totally Nonsarcastic Ways Layovers are Awesome  Bet you’ll agree…

Art & History

Chartres Cathedral Labyrinth

Chartres Cathedral labyrinth, Photo by Tom Flemming

In Tired of Visiting Cathedrals? 7 Reasons to Take Another Look , learn how you can avoid cathedral fatigue and really dig deeply into place.

And, I was very proud of one of our editors, Josh Garrick, who made art history when he was the very first American to exhibit at the National Archaeological Museum in Greece!

Movies

In Visiting the Shire you’ll be inspired by the landscapes of New Zealand, as shown in the Hobbit movies. You’ll also learn how you can take a Hobbit road trip!

In 6 Magical Items to Keep you Safe at Hogwarts, one of the students in our teen travel blogging program, Sarah Albom, discovers some fun and useful items from the Harry Potter Studios in Londonl

Holidays

Legend of Sleepy Hollow Story Teller

Jonathan Kruk performing at Old Dutch Church
Photo © Tom Nycz

This year, I had great fun at A Travelers Library exploring Medieval Christmas traditions and the Halloween back story of the Legend of Sleepy Hollow . What I love most about these articles is the connection from our practices and readings to history.

More history (and a recipe) awaits, in You Can Thank Napoleon for the Yule Log. Food writer and one of our editors Kristen J. Gough digs up the history of this holiday tradition – you’ll be surprised!

A Halloween Tale: Living the Legend of Sleepy Hollow

CULTURAL TRAVEL

By Jessica Voigts

Destination: Tarrytown New York

Book: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow in 1858 painting

The Headless Horseman Pursuing Ichabod Crane, Painting by John Quidor, 1858, Smithsonian Museum of American Art. From Google Art Project.

A headless horseman, riding through the night; the disappearance of the schoolteacher; the tale of unrequited love – all these come together in the classic and much-beloved story, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Beautifully written by Washington Irving, this short story is a creepy tale, one that sneaks up on the reader and lodges in the memory, several turns of phrase coming back at you at odd times throughout your life.

Legend of Sleepy Hollow, 1907 edition

The Book, 1907 edition, from Wiki Media, used with Creative Commons license.

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow was published in 1820, and is set in Sleepy Hollow, which is located near Tarrytown, New York. You may have read Washington Irving’s many other tales, including Rip Van Winkle. The treasures of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow lie in the compelling descriptions, which make you feel as if you are there in the story with Ichabod Crane…

“Not far from this village, perhaps about two miles, there is a little valley among high hills which is one of the quietest places in the whole world. A small brook murmurs through it and, with the occasional whistle of a quail or tapping of a woodpecker, is almost the only sound that ever breaks the uniform tranquillity.
From the listless repose of the place, this sequestered glen has long been known by the name of Sleepy Hollow.”

“Just ahead, where a small brook crossed the road, a few rough logs lying side by side served for a bridge. A group of oaks and chestnuts, matted thick with wild grapevines, threw a cavernous gloom over it.”

In the story, Ichabod Crane is a schoolteacher – quite a learned man, having “read several books quite through.” He (rather unsuccessfully) courts the beauty Katrina van Tassel, who is also being courted (successfully, we might add) by the strong Abraham “Bram Bones” van Brunt. One night after a harvest party at the van Tassels’, Crane rides home. He meets and is chased by a headless creature, riding hellbent alongside him with a specific purpose in mind. And what comes next will send shivers down your spine…

“Just then he saw the goblin rising in his stirrups, in the very act of hurling his head at him. Ichabod endeavored to dodge the horrible missile, but too late. It encountered his cranium with a tremendous crash – he was tumbled headlong into the dust, and Gunpowder, the black steed, and the goblin rider passed by like a whirlwind.”

Sleepy Hollow Legend in etching

“Ichabod pursued by the Headless Horseman”, an etching from Le Magasin Pittoresque, 1848, from Wikimedia in public domain.

Ichabod Crane was never seen again.

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (get it free here on Guttenberg) is one of those classics I read again each year – along with Robert Burns’ poem Halloween , Robert Burns’ tale Tam O’Shanter (1790), and tales of the Wild Hunt (epitomized by Bürger’s Der Wilde Jäger [the Wild Huntsman], 1796).

If you, too, are a fan of the Legend of Sleepy Hollow, you can visit the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, where the main spooky action of the tale was set (you can also visit another legend of Sleepy Hollow, this one in the cemetery of the church.

“An opening in the trees now cheered him with the hopes that the church bridge was at hand. He saw the whitewashed walls of the church dimly glaring under the trees beyond. He recollected the place where Brom Bones’s ghostly competitor had disappeared. ‘If I can but reach that bridge,”‘thought Ichabod, ‘I am safe.’ Just then he heard the black steed panting and blowing close behind him; he even fancied that he felt his hot breath.”

Legend of Sleepy Hollow Story Teller

Jonathan Kruk performing at Old Dutch Church
Photo © Tom Nycz

And if you’re lucky to visit the Hudson Valley around Halloween, book a ticket to see Master Storyteller Jonathan Kruk, accompanied by Jim Keyes on the organ, bring The Legend of Sleepy Hollow to life  at the Old Dutch Church.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Dutch Church then 

Legend of Sleepy Hollow church then

Etching of Sleepy Hollow’s old church from 1864 edition of Legend of Sleepy Hollow. In public domain, from WikiMedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And The old Church now:

Sleepy Hollow Old Church Now

Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, NY, USA. Oldest church building in New York and featured in Washington Irving’s “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”. Creative Commons license.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tired of Visiting Cathedrals? 7 Reasons to Take Another Look

Cultural Travel

By Jessica Voigts

When visiting cathedrals, have you ever been “cathedral’d” out?

Visting Cathedrals might make you sleepy

You might need a nap, like this Greek marble statue from the Louvre

You know what I mean – traveling around Europe, and seeing every single cathedral there ever was? After a while, it gets tiresome. After all, one cathedral sort of  looks like  the next. The first few you see are stunning – and you take hundreds of photos, amazed by the architecture, history, and purpose. Then, you get cathedral fatigue. Continue reading